UPDATED: Proctor Caching Set Up Guide

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Districts implementing the PARCC online assessments have the option to either live stream or proctor cache test data. Burlington and Revere Public Schools tested these options during the 2014 Field Test. Burlington live streamed all sessions while Revere used a proctor caching server.

What is proctor caching?

From the Texas Assessment site for PearsonAccess:

Proctor caching refers to pre-caching (downloading) test content from the Pearson testing server to a secure “local” computer prior to starting a test session. Because test content exists on the local network, the demand for external (Internet) bandwidth for online testing is reduced. With proctor caching, if your Internet “goes down” during testing, your students still have access to test content and can continue testing while your technicians resolve your Internet connection issue.

While Burlington and Revere had positive results, technology administrators in both districts recommend that most schools use the proctor caching option. One challenge though will be districts that lack connectivity between multiple school sites. These districts will need to set up caching servers at each location.

The (updated) document posted below is step by step set up guide for building a proctor caching Windows sever. Thank you to Jon Ferrara, IT Manager from Revere Public Schools, who has created the guide. Jon set up the proctor caching for Revere and found the installation to be relatively simple process. Revere had good results using the server during PARCC assessments.

UDPATED Proctor Caching Server Setup V2

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